A Look At “Girl, Interrupted”

There’s a lot to unpackage when we’re talking about the movie adaptation of “Girl, Interrupted”. There’s a lot to love and a lot to hate for this movie, and that list has just grown as this movie has aged into the classic turn of the millennia movie that it is. So that’s what I’m going to say before I just go ahead and get into what “Girl, Interrupted” Did really well, and what it didn’t do nearly as well on.

lead female roles that were groundbreaking

“Girl, Interrupted” came out in 1999, a powerhouse year for female roles in Hollywood. Movies “The Virgin Suicides”, “Cruel Intentions” and “Jawbreaker” also came out that same year, so there was a lot of buzz in Hollywood for movies that featured leading female roles. This is a stark contrast to the movies that were debut in the decade earlier; in 1989 “Far From Home” and “When Harry Met Sally” came out, and one could call these roles following a more traditional, gender conforming roles as far as their leading ladies were concerned.

“Girl, Interrupted” had an amazing cast of women portraying roles that were unheard of for women up until that point, and the women played their roles phenomenally. These actresses include Angelina Jolie, Winona Ryder, Brittany Murphy and Elizabeth Moss.

Angelina Jolie gives me chills in this movie from her incredible portrayal of Lisa, the sociopath that has the entire institution under her control.

Cinematography was well done

The plot isn’t linear, as Susanna isn’t a reliable narrator. Thus, there’s a lot of back and forth along a time-line. This movie does this well, cutting between the present day with a certain sound or visual hallucination that breaks from the present to the past that Susanna may be thinking about.

This is shown at times when a nurse knocks on the door and Susanna is transported back to a time, she’s with her boyfriend Toby.

DEPICTION OF MENTAL HEALTH COULD’VE BEEN BETTER…and here’s when it goes downhill

“You are a lazy, self indulgent little girl who is driving herself crazy.”

-Valerie Owens, RN (from Girl, Interrupted)

That is not how real psychology works. Susanna is diagnosed by her psychologist as having the condition of borderline personality. Borderline personality is a very real condition, and no licensed registered nurse would’ve told her she’s lazy and self-indulgent. This is the overarching theme to the entire movie- Susanna is just a spoiled brat that needs to just get over it. Once she is able to “get over it” she is cured.

Georgina Tuskin is supposed to be a pathological liar; however, viewers get a lot of their first insight on the other girls in the hospital from her during Susanna’s first night and most of what she says seems to be factual. For the most part, Georgina seems to be in control of herself at most times–so why is she at the facility? Is she still just soul searching for something more to “get over”?

Characterization leaned hard on mental illness

When the mental illness stopped working, characterization flaws were able to shine through. Some of these girls seemed to have no characterization or personality beyond “being crazy”. Janet’s entire character seemed to revolve around being anorexic and an asshole whenever the movie needed it. Cynthia Crowley is just a lesbian though she does proclaim to be a sociopath at one point. These people do exist; assholes exist in the world just as much as lesbians do. However, these characters should be more than just a quick caricature of what a character potentially could be thrown into the script.

This isn’t the case for every character as the main characters were great, and the casting crew was very picky with whom they were considering for the roles. I just really wished they had slowed down a bit and taken time on the supporting cast as well, because I’m sure a lot of these actresses had more talent than we were able to see on set.

Final Thoughts & Star rating

Girl, Interrupted” was great at the time it was released for many reasons. It has shown some flaws as it has aged, but not every movie needs to be a flawless, timeless work of art. “Girl, Interrupted” still is entertaining to watch in 2022, and with that I’m going to give this movie a 3/5 star rating.

Rating: 3 out of 5.

Review of “Tender is the Flesh”

“Tender is the Flesh can be found on Kindle

This book was never intended to grace the premise that is my Kindle library. Not this on early in our relationship, anyways. Typically, it takes a while for me to warm up to a novel so quickly; especially when I’ve seen “Tender is the Flesh” by Agustina Bazterrica talked about across the internet. I’ve relied heavily on Book of the Month and the aisles of department stores in person and online for my self-assigned reading list. My shopping list is easy, it’s accessible, and my spending problem also includes never cancelling subscriptions once I buy into them. If I hear about a book online, it will typically hibernate on some wish list until one day I add it into a shopping cart. I read too slow for libraries and spending sprees at bookstores I keep for rare occasions and mental health days.

On social media my timelines would be swarmed with divided opinions of this book. Everyone was reviewing this book, and some claimed that it was too mature for human consumption. The boundaries this book was said to push was going too far…so of course I had to read it. How could I say no?

First Impressions

The cover of the copy I downloaded is visually split vertically with a sepia portrait on the lower half of the novel and a red outline of a bull on the top half of the book. The cover is black, and there is a quote alongside the novel’s title by an author proclaiming this to be her newest novel of the year. On the top half of the book behind the red bull is black, which is a stark contrast, and the sepia portrait on the bottom half is offset by pink. The pink could be contrasted against the sepia, but it is not as stark as the contrast between the red and the black up top.

It is a bit of an eerie front cover, but it looks like a horror paperback book that I’d find at a used bookstore. The title makes the book standout for me because readers wouldn’t know what sort of horror genre this is just based off the title. Let’s be real, “The Haunting of Hill House” is probably a great book, but we know what it’s about. “Tender is the Flesh” let’s the imagination wander until you read the back cover.

Once you read a back cover summary for this book it’s game on.

During Reading

This book is horrifying and repulsive. I would love to compare and contrast this book to another dystopian novel one day, perhaps George Orwell’s “1984” because there’s a lot to unpack here.

There are reasons why I cannot see how an entire society would resort to cannibalism if we were no longer allowed to eat pork/beef/poultry, but a horror novel doesn’t have to make sense to work. With that being said, this book still made my skin crawl.

This book may be too disturbing for some to finish. It’s a very visual book and the narrator gets lost within his own train of thought a lot. There were some points that I had to read slower than others to really process what in the actual eff was happening. Some of the content was very graphic and because there’s jargon being used that I’m not familiar with I had to slow down.

After Reading & Star rating

I read this book within a day. Yes, it was disturbing but it was a fantastic dystopian horror novel. The author had a message they needed to convey about society, and they did so masterfully. This book will make the reader think about the darker side of humanity and about the meat processing industry. It’s meant for the reader to feel uncomfortable about these topics.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

My first 5/5-star rating in 2022 belongs to “Tender is the Flesh“. If you’re a reader with a vivid imagination you may have some trouble getting through this book because the material is very graphic at times. However, if you don’t mind the subject matter then I highly recommend this book.

“Blue Lagoon” Did NOT Age Well

Whats up everyone? Today while I was home and bored I decided to watch this movie on Netflix. I had a deeply unlocked memory of Brook Shields playing in it during the infancy of her career, but I had never watched it. What I wasn’t ready for was a 1980 film portraying a couple of Victorian era children being stranded on an island and having a sexual awakening for an hour an a half of run time.

Before Watching

As aforementioned, I had a bit of background knowledge going into this movie, but not by much. I knew Brooke Shields had played in this movie, and I vaguely remember a sequel/remake coming out of this movie a few years ago. I had never watched the remake of the movie. My mother I remembered mentioning how she hated that all of her era movies were being rewritten for the big screen once more. Due to that, I knew this movie probably dated somewhere in the 70s-80s; my mother is a boomer and will go absolutely rabid for remakes of movies during this time.

During Watching

For all intensive purposes, the background to this movie is as follows: Ship gets shipwrecked, two children and the ship cook Paddy survives. Paddy dies and leaves the children to fend for themselves on an island only inhabited by a tribe on the other side of the island. There’s not much to know there, except that Paddy forbids the children from going to the other side of the island, claiming that it is “by law” they cannot ever go join the tribe. I sort of wish there was more to the tribe than that, but all you’ll really see is a couple minutes of screen time of the tribe as they kill someone.

So the movie ages up the two children, Richard and Emmeline pretty quickly after the cook dies. Not too weird unless you were prepared to watch “Lord of the Flies” — but they decide to age the children up to puberty and then decide to ditch the clothes for the majority of screen time.

Which is only made more awkward by two actors that are teenagers themselves. Upon googling I realized that Brooke Shields herself is 14 and Christopher Atkins is 19.

Weird. Talk about very weird and uncomfortable.

I know it’s a different time, but even then I still feel that unless I was a teenager myself this would’ve made me feel a bit uncomfortable back in the 1980s as well. This movie really likes the idea of sexualizing innocence. This was seen in many different scenes and scenarios throughout the movie. For example, Emmeline gets her period in one take and doesn’t know what’s happening. Richard wants to come closer and to take a look at where she’s bleeding from and then Emmaline shies away from him before he could get any closer. The way the characters talk to each other is very child-like. I know that they are portraying two children that had grown up outside of society and social norms, but some scenes are uncomfortable to get through because of this. Then to top it all off they are scantily clad the entire time.

The worst part of all was when they ended up conceiving a baby and then they had no clue what to do with it/him. I thought perhaps survival instinct would take over in these sort of scenarios, but that isn’t the case as they try feeding him coconut water as opposed to breast milk. After they seem to figure out how to feed them all seems well again, until they end up on a lifeboat they had and drift too far from shore after fighting a shark.

Yes they had a lifeboat. Yes they fought a shark.

I could go into an entire rant about the 70s fetishising young teenage girls and hatred of sharks as shown by Jaws– but thats an article for another day.

Final Thoughts

When this movie had came out in June of 1980, it was met by mixed reviews by critics for an array of reasons; Brooke Shield’s performance, the overall movie and execution being called out in the process (source). But it was a box office success, so make of that what you will if you’re planning on watching it. I will give the Blue Lagoon this: it took risks. Were the risks worth it? Up to you. For me I’m not the biggest fan of the movie.

Rating:

Rating: 1 out of 5.

Overall I give this movie a 1/5 stars. I didn’t like the oversexualization of teen actors. The premise of the movie didn’t make sense as there was multiple chances for the children to get off the island to the point it was almost comical. This movie didn’t feel romantic and it didn’t feel suspenseful. It just felt…wrong.

Review of “The People We Keep”

I know I haven’t really been around recently on my blog, and I wish I had a better excuse behind my absence. No, I haven’t been working on an elaborate project lately. I haven’t gotten married or have given birth to any offspring. But I have been reading some pretty decent books that I wanted to share with you guys and talk about.

“The People We Keep” by Allison Larkin was my nominee for this year’s book in my Book of the Month app. Yes, I feel in love with it that hard and that deeply. Have I read most of the other nominated books on the list? Not yet, but I’m slowly getting there. Do I believe this book generally deserves the nomination and potentially winning the award? Yes.

This book is an emotional roller coaster. You follow the life of April Sawaki, a vagabond who moves up and down the East Coast following a series of unfortunate events that leaves this young woman believing she is not worthy of being loved. This book tackles deep topics such as family dysfunction and mental illness. It really goes in deep about the scars everyone carries based on the people we have loved and harmed in our lives, and those who have harmed us as well.

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As a really reflective person who didn’t grow up in the best of situations, I can relate to this character. I can relate to her on a deeper level and on an introspective level as I’ve watched a lot of people grow and come out of really crummy situations, thanks a lot in part both to the individual and the great support system they surround themselves with.

The story takes place in the 90s. Hello. The 90s. As a millennial I have an unnatural obsession for the decade I started grammar school in. The author leaves little nuggets of nostalgic joy into the story line. April has a Ren and Stimpy flashlight and a potential dislike for Pearl Jam. I enjoy whenever writers put time pieces into their stories, but I do know a lot of people believes it distracts from the overall plot or that it’ll just age the book that quicker. I read out a passage to my boyfriend and he literally cringed that they were hinting at a song on the radio mentioning to not call him daughter. He just thinks it’s unnecessary and the author is just trying to be cool.

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Whether you think it’s cute or cringe, that’s up to you.

If you ever sometimes feel like you are not loved, this is a great book to pick up and remember that you are deeply loved. It’s not always about the people we interact with every single day, but it’s about the people we keep and hold to us most in the darkest times of our lives.

Rating:

Rating: 5 out of 5.

5/5 Stars

Originally I thought about giving this book 4.5/5 stars because let’s face it, I can be a hard ass. It’s hard for me to find a story that I believe cannot be enhanced in any way, but this story deserves all the stars I have in my box. This book was thought provoking, it was easy to read and get through, and the characters were well thought out.

What did you guys think? Have you read this book yet? What would you consider the greatest book to come out in 2021?

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Gossip Girl 2.0

A Gossip Girl Reboot appeared on HBO Max this morning for those of us in the United States–

https://www.hbomax.com/

The trailer for the show premiered earlier this year, and looked to be the next generation has finally graced the halls of Constance Billard. I had grown up watching Gossip Girl when it had first premiered in 2007, so I was of course a bit more reserved about this next generation. However, I can appreciate that my Gossip Girl I grew up with was tailored towards a millennial audience whereas this new show will be more than likely fit for viewers of a Gen Z audience.

But there’s a few moments of the new Gossip Girl that had me going “What the hell?” and here they are…

For those of you who don’t want to find out what happens…SPOILER ALERT!

Gossip Girl is Not Unknown to Viewers – and It’s Creepy

Gossip Girl is not unknown to viewers in this new reboot. Which is fair, since Gossip Girl was exposed at the ending of the old series. However, the direction the writers decide to take with the new Gossip Girl is…questionable.

Why would they choose the teachers to be the new face behind Gossip Girl? Just why? Why are grown adults this involved in the inner workings of the student body? The fact that they’re doing it as a form of “teaching their students a lesson” is a little more than veiling the true malice beyond their actions.

We get it, teachers of Constance. They’re spoiled and self-entitled brats and you don’t want them to become “the next Brett Cavanaugh” as one of the faculty members put it. But I don’t think standing outside their homes taking candid photos of students really is going to send them the right message, thanks.

So the teachers are actively trying to protect their crummy, underpaid jobs as academics by giving those snotty, power-wielding shitheads a complex and turning them against one another. Okay, got it.

Missing the Soundtrack

Where is the music? From the starting sequence of Serena Van Der Woodson on the train back in ’07, Gossip Girl had a great soundtrack for the time. The first premiere episode was lacking in this category.

Remember when Serena crashed Blair’s party? Yeah, you wouldn’t remember that scene if “What Goes Around…Comes Around” by Justin Timberlake wasn’t playing in the background.

Fashion, Fashion, Fashion

The reboot had some great fashion choices again, and that’s what’s held true throughout both shows. This reboot was much bolder and more daring with the fashion choices in a very fashion forward and feminine and powerful way. Shaved heads, bright colored hair, bold neon dresses and stunning heels, this premiere really stepped up to take the fashion choices to the next level.

The fashion show during A and Z’s stand-off was eye-catching, and is probably the only post on Gossip Girl that would have really made sense on an Instagram timeline. The show-off was a powerful landing.

Diverse Characters – Let Me Love Them

Contrast to it’s 2007 original show, the new version of Gossip Girl would feature a much more diverse cast. It’s 2021 and it’s about time we’re starting to see representation of all communities and backgrounds in shows. There’s no reason why Gossip Girl would have reasoning to pick a cast type based off of any certain background, since the most important background of these characters are the same–Upper East Side (at least part time).

The cast of the new show are newcomers to Hollywood, and I would really like to see their acting potential. However this dialogue is about as dry as a bottle of champagne, with some moments making me cringe. I really hope the next episode does this group justice.

Random Sex

I know there was talk about this show being more risque than it’s original– but come on now at least make the sex scenes make sense. There is a total of at least four sex scenes, with one even in the middle of a very crowded party. Come on now, even Chuck Bass is jealous of the amount of time these teens have just to get it on. It would make much better sense if the sex was at least being used as a plot device, but so far it doesn’t seem to make much sense beyond trying to grab an audience and drag them in.

Gone are the days of Virgin Queen B.

So far, this just seems like it’s going to be a corny one season run-off of an otherwise great show if something doesn’t change. If you haven’t watched it yet, I’d suggest passing up on it to watch the original.

January Reading List: The Christmas That Was Patterson

Hey guys what is up? I figured we’d start off my first reading list of the new year a bit differently compared to what I’ve posted before in the past. The past few monthly reading lists I had made felt really scattered and thrown together; mostly in part because I was just finding myself again on a writing platform (this blog) and I wasn’t exactly sure what I was doing. I also just started getting back into my love of literature and books, so I was just reading and posting about books that I thought would be interesting to read or ones I had started off earlier in the year I had intended to finish reading.

Although I still have a few books even on my December reading list I would like to finish off in 2021, I want to make these reading hauls a little more interesting and cohesive by creating a theme each month and focus my reading around said theme. 

This month I decided to start off January on a good note by reading books by authors I dislike, because I figured that would be a good way to start off the New Year on a positive note. 

For this Christmas, my father decided to buy me a bunch of James Patterson books. My father is not a very bookish man and had no way of knowing that I’m generally not a James Patterson fan and the gift was all around sweet and very thoughtful so I’m still planning on reading the books he gave me. 

Hush

Oh boy, okay. So right off the bat, my first impression is the usual ones I have whenever I see a James Patterson cover. There’s my boy James’s name almost as big as the title and then his co-writer’s name is stuck on the bottom as an afterthought. The cover is pretty simple paperback cover with what looks to be a woman standing down the end of a dark tunnel facing a light. 

The back doesn’t tell me much in the way of the story except James Patterson’s review of his own book and USA Today and TIME telling me this book is not one you want to miss out on. It looks like this may be an installment in a series, so I may have to get a few other books before reading this one. It appears to be a thriller about a detective who’s trying to right a wrong by proving the innocence of a woman who’s been wrongfully jailed. 

Revenge

My first impression is still the same as the first book when it comes to the font. James Patterson’s name is listed at the top in large font just as big as the title, and then another author thrown in there below. I turn it over and the back isn’t a quote he has written instead of a synopsis so that is good. Instead we do have a small synopsis about the presumably main character David Shelley and his background. It appears this will be another suspenseful novel. Shelley is a former SAS soldier and bodyguard, and the daughter of the family he used to bodyguard for has presumably committed suicide. The family have a hard time believing their daughter would do such a thing, so they ask their former bodyguard for help in finding out what really happened.

I’m curious as to why a family would ask their bodyguard for help in doing investigative work. Obviously Patterson isn’t above a detective story, so there has to be a reason behind it. I’m hoping it’s not just because he wants a bodyguard in place of a detective because it’ll make it more fun to read. 

The Midwife Murders

First impression: his name for once doesn’t appear to be as big and flashy as the book title. Perhaps because the blood red title finally contrasts from Jame’s silver name title just above it. The paperback cover is blue, with a woman wearing a dark blue coat running down a flight of concrete steps. I cannot tell which era she is from, although I’m pretty sure I’ve never read a historic James Patterson book as of yet, although I’ve only read one of them. 

The back synopsis I had to read a couple of times because it just sounds like gibberish nonsense. Lucy Ryuan is a senior nurse who doesn’t see pregnancy as a condition but her life’s work. Yet, when two kidnappings and a viscous stabbing happen on her watch, she decides to be the one to try and change things. 

The wording just sounds really awkward to me, and at this point I wouldn’t put it past whoever does these back synopsis on these books just going “what the hell? Let’s write out whatever we feel like! Nobody cares, they’ll just read whatever we print out.” 

Okay, so it appears I have my work cut out for me this month. I would honestly hope to be surprised, but I know we’re just going to have to wait and see. I also have “Doctor Sleep” by Stephen King that I will like to be reading as well this month, but I have a lot to say about Stephen King so that’s going to be its own kettle of fish. 

Don’t forget to like and subscribe to my blog if you enjoy reading my stuff! It really makes my day whenever I get a new notification on my phone that someone else likes what I type out. 

The Bomb of Drugstore Beauty Balms

Hey guys! So I wanted to talk to you this week about a beauty product I had used many times in the past that seemed to work really well for me in taking care of split ends and fixing my hair after I had used boxed dyes on my hair. 

I have been in love with this balm since I had started using it back in 2012 when I started dying my hair black for the first time. This balm always helped me combat the dryness that comes with the out of the box amateur hair dyes we all seem to use at one point or another in our lives. This damage erasing balm is recommended for use in placement of your usual conditioner. You want to work this at the ends of your hair where most of the damage is going to be, and then spot treat any other dry spots you have in your hair. 

For women with curly hair, I have been told this product works best on top of your usual conditioner, although I would warn you to watch out for weighting down your hair or your hair drying out too much. 

This balm is going to be really easy to use, and as soon as you get it out of the container you can feel the luxurious, silky smoothness. I’m not a big fan of the color or the packaging, like so many other people have mentioned before in the past I do wish this product came with a pump as opposed to just staying loosely in the jar, but I’m not going to beat up a product over something as simple as that. The smell is so good, especially if you like the smell of most L’Oreal shampoos and conditioners.

 

I hope I supplied at least a little more information for you to make a decision today on whether or not this may be a good product option for you. I know that it’s an uphill battle sometimes when it comes to dry and damaged hair, especially if you live in a place with a dry climate. 

An Honest Review of “Hush” by James Patterson

“Hush” by James Patterson

Okay, folks. The moment I think we’ve all been waiting for has come to an end. I am a quarter way through my January Reading list, which means I have now read my first book by James Patterson for the year 2021. For this month I had decided to read the books my father had gifted to me at Christmastime by an author whom I don’t typically enjoy the writing style of. 

My first impressions of the book prior to reading was that he is a attention whore on the front of the book. He takes all of the attention off of his co-writers and it seems to be all about him. On the inside of this book, I quickly catch onto the rhythmic format that is the chapter layout. Chapters are very short, about 1-3 pages long with the longest chapter being 6 pages in length. It’s almost as if someone in his public relations board said “hey, the span of the average reader is about seven minutes long. We have seven minutes to write something important before the reader loses interest.” Which I guess would make sense for the mass publishing industry, but this is what I think before I’ve researched anything about James Patterson’s publishing company or writing style. 

I did a little research into looking into Patterson’s history in an attempt to explain his advertising campaign, and it’s just as I expected. Patterson was a advertising executive for J. Walter Thompson until 1996 when upon retirement he became a full-time writer. This makes me understand a little bit more of his background, and it gives me a bit more respect for his advertising campaign for his book since he knows what he is doing when it comes to marketing.

This book is not the first one in the series, but it was easy to follow as just a book I happened to read on a random whim. The main character, Harriet Blue, is a rogue detective with her partner Whitt and other partner Tox. This tagalong team is asked by a county commissioner who despises them to find his missing junkie daughter and his granddaughter. This trope feels very overdone to me in the detective mystery genre. I do not like the county commissioner always being talked up as being this biggest tool and then asking the rogue cop baddies to halp him out because the bad guys have captured AB or C from him. The entire rogue cop detective thriller is overdone for me, but once again I’ll admit up to this genre not being my biggest cup of tea. 

Harriet Blue decides once she’s out of prison to continue helping her cellmate Dolly from the outside when Dolly is wrongfully accused of the murder of a beloved prison doctor, Dr. Goldman. This happens to take place the same day Harriet is being discharged from the prison, so they do not come into contact with at all. How very convenient. 

Harriet has to go live with her retired chief detective Pops because she has no place to go. Pops owns a at home gym where he trains troubled youth, and I get a whole Rocky’s mentor from this guy. Harriet’s first thing she does outside of meeting up with her old crew is get laid. One thing that is inked through this book quite heavily is the romantic partnerships of the ragtag team of main characters, which you don’t see build up much in this book. Tox is seeing a doctor whom has saved his life in one of the previous books. Whitt has a thing for Harry, and Harry is out getting dick like a champ right out of prison. 

There is a plot twist mentioned at the beginning of the book, but honestly there’s a very short list of suspects and a few automatically stand out the moment they are introduced to the audience, at least in my opinion. The build up fizzles out quite quickly with the most suspenseful part being Tox jumps off a highway bridge to save two little girls out of a car. There is a lot of running around for clues and a few suspenseful moments, but that’s just about it as far as this book goes. 

I think what makes Patterson’s books so enthralling to read are his short chapters. Having chapters so short made it easy for me to get reading done in multiple sittings since I usually like to read whole chapters in a sitting. I feel like he sums up what he’s getting across in just a single chapter here and there, so all of the other chapters came across as fillers to me. I would have appreciated a more suspenseful punch from the world’s best selling author, but in some cases I think we’re going for quantity instead of quality and I believe this goes in the case of James Patterson’s writing. 

I would question whether or not Patterson writes any of his own material at this point or if he just has a board of writers that sit down and do the dirty work for him underneath his pen name. He has been criticized many times by others within the industry considering the short span it takes for him to come up with a new book as well as his habit of reviewing his own literary fiction. How can you give an honest review of your own fiction if you were the one who supposedly wrote it?

Overall, I give this book 3/5 stars, and I’m going to say this book was a job done okay by Candice Fox, surely the unsung hero behind the computer screen. This book was impressively easy to follow despite being in the middle of the series, and I do like Harriet Blue as a character despite how generic this book was feeling to me at the start of reading. There was a few spelling errors like a misplaced ‘S’ here or there which I’m disappointed wasn’t picked up by the editing team, but I’m sure it’s more to do with the need to meet a deadline as opposed to anything really wrong within the editing process.

Rating:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

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Quirky Holiday Ideas When You Don’t Know What to Buy

We all have that one person in our lives that you never know what to buy them for Christmas. I’ve compiled a list of ideas that are useful or quirky in some way but are that perfect gift to give this Christmas. These gifts are going to be perfect for a broad range of people and ages.

Glass Electric Kettle

Moon Lamp

Inverted Umbrella

Solutions and Other Problems

Wi-fi Doorbell Video Camera

Care Wastebasket

Knitting Kit

Desk Organizer

Fire HD Tablet

Fuzzy Christmas Socks

Still confused as to what you should buy? Gift cards will never go out of style! I know some people feel as if gift cards are unsentimental gifts, but on the contrary, you are giving your giftee the gift to look for something that is going to most fit their needs.

If you’re still on the fence about whether or not gift cards are sentimental enough, you can always give them a small gift like a book or a piece of jewelry or a candle to go along with your gift card. Throughout the year I’ll usually include small snacks with my gift card, since snacks will never go out of style.

Tell me what you think in the comments below! Was this list helpful? Don’t forget to like and subscribe if you enjoy my content! I upload new content to my blog 2-3 times a week.